Teach Your Kids about Election Day: Books and Apps

presidends

Election time can be such a busy time. As moms, we’re trying to sort out all of the candidates and issues for ourselves, both locally and nationally, but we want to keep our children informed and involved in the process, as well.

In our family, we’ve started a new tradition of recording the Presidential debates as well as the national evening newscast through our DVR, so that – once the homework is finished, we can all sit down and watch the coverage. We like to speed through the commercials, and we find ourselves pausing the broadcast frequently to explain things or give extra background information. It takes a good deal of time each evening (and, to be perfectly honest, it doesn’t actually happen EVERY evening), but every little bit helps. Any kind of dialogue we can have with our kids over the candidates and the issues facing our country is time well spent.

On that note, here are a few fun books and apps and to help teach kids of all ages about voting and the founding of this country.


Disney American Presidents App

From Disney Publishing Worldwide. Available online for $3.99
A fresh, new way to learn about the extraordinary men who inhabited the oval office and set the course for our country, just in time for the Presidential elections and inauguration! Sit in the oval office and flip through the Unofficial Scrapbook—you’ll find plenty of amazing stories and new perspectives about the men who helped shape our nation on the windy road to our modern Presidential elections.
Ages:
3-5
Platforms: iOS

 

Grace for President
Grace for President
Available online from Amazon.com for $15.99
Where are the girls?” When Grace’s teacher reveals that the United States has never had a female president, Grace decides to be the first. And she immediately starts off her political career as a candidate the school’s mock election. But soon, she realizes that she has entered a tough race. Her popular opponent claims to be the “best man for the job”-and seems to have captured all the male votes-while Grace concentrates on being the best person. In this timely story, author Kelly DiPucchio not only gives readers a fun introduction to the American electoral system, but also teaches them the value of hard work, courage, and independent thought-and offers an inspiring example of how to choose our leaders.

 

Phineas and Ferb #10: Ride the Voter Coaster!
Phineas and Ferb #10: Ride the Voter Coaster!
Available online from amazon.com for $5.99
When a junior mayor election is announced in Danville, Phineas and Ferb decide to run against each other! This 8×8 features an original story and a pull-out poster.

 

John, Paul, George & Ben
John, Paul, George & Ben
Available online from Amazon for $12.23
Once there were four lads. John [Hancock], Paul [Revere], George [Washington], and Ben [Franklin]. Oh yes, there was also Tom [Jefferson], but he was annoyingly independent and hardly ever around. These lads were always getting into trouble for one reason or another. In other words, they took a few. liberties. And to be honest, they were not always appreciated. This is the story of five little lads before they became five really big Founding Fathers.

5 Tips for Better Understanding Your Teenager

Do you ever feel like your connection with your teen is slipping? Here are five tactics for stopping the slip…steps you can take to get closer to them and to better understand them.

#1 Ask Questions and Listen

The first step to understanding your teen is to ask questions. Now there’s a strategy here. Many teens give yes/no answers when you ask them a question. The trick is to do it when they’re more likely to open up. Driving in the car seems to be a good time.

When you ask questions, make sure to listen to the answers – even if you don’t understand half of the words they’re using. It’s okay to ask for clarification. As you’re listening, take mental notes. They’ll come in handy in the next step.

#2 Google It!

If you have no idea what your child is talking about, Google it. Google the things they express interest in, the people, and even the language they use. The Urban Dictionary can be incredibly useful. For example, “Feels” – A wave of emotions that sometimes cannot be adequately explained. “Watching Back to the Future gives me all sorts of nostalgic feels.”

#3 Listen

One of the best ways to better understand your teen is to listen in to see what they’re talking about with their friends, and what kinds of things their friends are involved in. Try to be around them when they’re with their friends. Attend events with them. Volunteer to drive them and their friends to events. And encourage them to invite their friends over.

#4 Get Involved

Start taking an active interest in your teen’s interests. For example, if they’re involved in the local drama club then volunteer to help out with the club. If they are active online and have their own YouTube channel, then by all means watch that channel but also watch the other YouTubers that your child follows.

#5 Relax

Each generation has their own trends, language, and interests. Guaranteed, when you were a teenager your parents thought you were from another planet as well. It’s the way of the world. It’s okay to not be able to completely relate with your teenager. In fact, it’s normal.

Do what you can to connect with them. Let them know that you’re interested in their lives and then relax. You don’t need to be a friend with your teenager, nor do you need to share the same interests. It’s enough to let them know that you care.

For further reading:

10 Best Gifts for Your Teen: Raising Teens with Love and Understanding
10 Best Gifts for Your Teen: Raising Teens with Love and Understanding
Price: $11.11
Patt and Steve Saso navigated all the parenting perils from infancy to preteen insecurity, but nothing could prepare them for the unpredictability of adolescence. One day their teenager might say, “I love you,” after the morning ride to school, and the next he might sit in the back seat, sulking in silence. In their new book, 10 Best Gifts For Your Teen, the Sasos offer valuable advice to help families maintain strong relationships through the often turbulent teenage years. Combining Patt’s expertise as a marriage and family therapist with Steve’s experience as a high school educator, the Sasos share personal and professional anecdotes in this dispatch from the parenting trenches, detailing what adolescents want and need from their parents for emotional support. Teenagers will test the limits. Parents will make mistakes. But no matter how distant and resentful they appear to be, or how disrespectful of parental authority, teenagers internalize their parents’ words and actions. 10 Best Gifts For Your Teen – which include respect, room, role-modeling, responsibility and reconciliation – teaches parents how to relate when needed, and to relent when necessary, offering support without infringing on their teenagers’ burgeoning sense of freedom. Patt and Steve Saso have shared their wisdom through their Saso Seminars, providing inspiration and information to help parents raise respectful and successful children. And now, with 10 Best Gifts For Your Teen, they have given a gift to parents across the country who want their teenager’s transition from childhood to adulthood to be a smooth and rewarding one.

Helping Your Troubled Teen: Learn to Recognize, Understand, and Address the Destructive Behavior of Today's Teens and Preteens
Helping Your Troubled Teen: Learn to Recognize, Understand, and Address the Destructive Behavior of Today’s Teens and Preteens
Price: $8.94
The first “adolescent primer” on the market Destructive trends among today’s youth are growing, making life very different from when their parents were growing up. The primary four self-destructive behaviors in adolescence today are excessive alcohol and substance abuse, promiscuity, self mutilation (ie: cutting and burning), and eating disorders. These will be covered in detail, along with other issues like Internet addiction and suicide. These problems are not only detrimental to teens’ mental and physical health, but the legal consequences for injurious behavior have also changed. Identification and prevention are the most important aspects in stopping teenage self-destructive behavior. This book offers a comprehensive look at teens self destructive behavior and gives parents solutions for dealing with it. Helping Your Troubled Teen instructs parents on how to identify an at-risk adolescent and discuss warning signs of injurious behavior, before the problem(s) become severe enough that a child is in crisis and/or legal actions are taken against them. Personal anecdotes and testimonials from both parents and their teenagers who have been confronted with and have engaged in self-destructive behavior are also included. McLean Hospital is the largest psychiatric teaching facility of Harvard Medical School. Founded in 1811 as the original psychiatric department of the MGH, it moved to Belmont in 1895. McLean Hospital operates the largest psychiatric neuroscience research program of any Harvard University-affiliated facility and of any private psychiatric hospital in the country. The Child and Adolescent Program at McLean Hospital is one of the foremost clinical programs for helping young people and their families cope with psychiatric illness and the challenges it often brings. There are extensive ties with community services, and each therapeutic program of children and adolescents in inpatient, residential and outpatient services is tailored to the specific needs of the child and family.

Helping Your Kids with Life’s Transitions

Life is full of transitions – from preschool to kindergarten, middle school to high school, and many times they can be very challenging. Parents can help with the emotional challenges of transitioning, but sometimes it’s hard to know how to help.

Here are some tips on how you can help your kids make those important transitions.

Preschool to Kindergarten

Here may be one of the first big transitions in your child’s life. The emotional challenges of this age involve separation anxiety and social readiness (or unreadiness). Here are some tips.

* Tour the school with your child over the summer before he or she begins kindergarten. Familiarizing her with the teacher, classrooms, playground, and overall layout of the school will help a lot.

* Understand her feelings, say experts. Parents may get impatient with separation anxiety and tears, but if you’re going to support your child, it’s a good idea to understand where she’s coming from. Talk about how she feels, and help her put words to the feelings (that can be hard at this age). This helps her identify the feelings which may make them less scary.

Grade School to Middle School

This can be a big one. It’s an emotional age at this point, so parents would do well to prepare themselves. Some of these tips may help.

* Understanding feelings is important at this age, too, but it’s not the same as going from preschool to grade school. Obviously, your child doesn’t need words to identify what he’s feeling. As a parent, you can help by recognizing the priority shift your child will have. His emotions are more focused on peers and the opposite sex than they were in grade school.

* Asking questions without judgment can help parents connect emotionally with their kids during transitional challenges. Try to find out what your child’s concerns, fears, and apprehensions are, as well as the things he is looking forward to and is excited about.

Middle School to High School

Kids start feeling independent and “grown up” about this time. Here are some tips on dealing with this transition.

* Help them solve their own problems. At this point, calling the school for every complaint may not help your child. The transition may be smoother if you can offer some problem solving skills and strategies to help your child help herself. This is an opportunity to help your child come up with a plan to help solve the issues at hand.

* Go to orientation if it’s offered. If it’s not, tour the school. Find teachers and advisors who can talk to your student about her fears and concerns, which will help alleviate some of those concerns. Many times, kids fear high school for reasons that really aren’t realistic.

High School to College

Sending your child off to college is a big step! How can parents help their increasingly-independent child with this transition? Here are some tips.

* Validate your child’s feelings about this big change. It may be tempting to blow off their problems – they don’t have “real problems” grown-ups may think – but remember your college-aged kids don’t have the life experience and frame of reference that you do. Being patient with their concerns can help make their transition smoother. Let them vent!

* Keep in touch with care packages and special gifts at key times (like final exams or his birthday). This helps support them more than you may know!

Le Petit Gourmet – Ratatouille Recipe for Babies and Toddlers

ratatouille

Guest Post by Cheryl Tallman,  FreshBaby.com

Ratatouille is a traditional French vegetable dish. The French word “touille” means to toss food. Toss, sauté, and blend the ingredients below to delight your tiniest gourmet’s taste buds.

Ingredients:

  • 2 Tbsp. Olive oil
  • 1/2 large Onion, diced
  • 2 cloves Garlic minced
  • 1 can (14 oz.) Diced tomatoes
  • 1 medium Eggplant, diced
  • 2 small Zucchini, diced
  • 2 tsp. Herbs d’ Provence
  • 1 tsp. Salt

Directions:

Set a 12-inch sauté pan over medium heat and add the olive oil. Once hot, add the onions and garlic to the pan and cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the eggplant, zucchini, tomatoes, Herbs d’ Provence, and salt to the pan and continue to cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. This dish can be served for the whole family to enjoy and some of it can be pureed for your little gourmet!

To make pureed baby food:

Place the Ratatouille in a blender or food processor and puree to a smooth texture. Spoon Ratatouille into So Easy Storage Trays, cover and freeze.

To serve: Defrost cubes and warm slightly. This is a delicious vegetable dish that goes well with cooked brown rice, mashed pasta, tofu or chicken.

About the Author: Cheryl Tallman is the co-founder of Fresh Baby, creators of the award-winning So Easy Baby Food Kit, and author of the So Easy Baby Food Basics: Homemade Baby Food in Less Than 30 Minutes Per Week and So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips and Simple Recipes for the Toddler Years. Visit Cheryl online at www.FreshBaby.com for more delicious tips.

Learn more about Cheryl’s work:

So Easy Baby Food (Spiral)
So Easy Baby Food (Spiral)
Price: $18.29
Presented in an innovative format that is a combination of cookbook, workbook, and instructional guide, this reference helps parents provide dietary essentials for their babies through all-natural, homemade baby food. With more than 40 recipes for fruit, vegetable, and protein purees, hundreds of suggestions for creating meals, and tips for enhancing flavor with herbs, parents will learn to easily prepare food in only 30 minutes per week that looks, smells, and tastes better than any mass-produced variety. In addition to the recipes, the guide provides information on the benefits of homemade baby food, introducing solid foods, and developing healthy eating habits, while the workbook format makes it easy to record allergies and other reactions.

So Easy Baby Food Basics - Cheryl Tallman - Paperback
So Easy Baby Food Basics – Cheryl Tallman – Paperback
Price: $8.95
Buy So Easy Baby Food Basics by Cheryl Tallman in Paperback for the low price of 8.95. Find this product in Cooking > Baby Food.

Gourmet Baby & Toddler Recipes

Mexi Veggie Chile Stew

Tiniest Gourmet – Recipes for Babies and Toddlers
A guest post from Cheryl Tallman, www.FreshBaby.com

Mexi-Veggie Chile Stew

This terrific vegetable stew is made with popular Mexican vegetables and a hint of green chiles. Green chiles are the perfect “first” chile pepper to introduce. They have a gentle, mild flavor. While you can puree this recipe to a smooth texture, it’s perfect as a stage 3 food with a slightly chunky texture.

2 medium zucchini, diced

1/2 cup diced tomatoes (fresh or canned)

1 ear corn, kernels cut off cob (or 3/4 cup frozen corn)

1 Tbsp. canned green chiles

1/4 cup water

Place all the ingredients in a pan and bring to a boil over high heat. Cover the pan and turn heat down to medium. Cook for 15 minutes.

Pour the vegetable stew into a blender or food processor and pulse to chunky texture. Spoon the Mexi-Veggie Chile Stew into So Easy Storage Trays, Cover and Freeze.

When ready to serve, defrost and warm up the cubes. This stew is a delicious vegetable dish. You can also add cooked brown rice or fork-mashed black beans to it before serving.

Toddler Treat: Empanadas

Street food is popular throughout the cities of Mexico. Food vendors sell tacos, tamales and empanadas. Empanadas are small pastries stuffed with sweet or savory fillings. In Mexico, sweet fillings in empanadas are the most popular. We cut our empanadas pastry into 4 ½-inch circles to make a smaller empanada that is perfect for tiny hands to enjoy.

Banana & Chocolate Filling:

1 banana, diced

1/4 cup chocolate chips

Juice of 1/4 lemon

Sprinkle of cinnamon

Powdered sugar

Combine banana, chocolate chips, lemon juice and cinnamon in a small bowl. Set aside

Cheese & Olive Filling:

2 ounces Colby-jack cheese, diced

1 Tbsp. small green olives stuffed with pimentos, sliced

1 Tsp. cilantro, chopped

Combine cheese, olives and cilantro in a small bowl. Set aside.

 

Empanadas:

Empanada filling (recipes above)

1 sheet of puff pastry

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Roll out puff pastry into a thin layer on a lightly floured surface. Using a 4-5 inch circle cookie cutter, cut pastry into 8 rounds.

Place about 1 Tablespoon of empanada mixture in the middle of one of the pastry rounds. Brush the edges with water and fold in half. Press edges with a fork to seal the edges. Place on cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Repeat with the rest of the pastry rounds and filling.

Bake the empanadas for 15-20 minutes or until they are golden brown.

Remove from oven and let cool slightly. Dust the Banana and Chocolate Empanadas with powdered sugar when slightly cooled.

About the author: Cheryl Tallman is the co-founder of Fresh Baby, creators of the award-winning So Easy Baby Food Kit, and author of the So Easy Baby Food and the new book So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips and Simple Recipes for the Toddler Years. Visit Cheryl online at www.FreshBaby.com for more delicious tips.

Learn more about Cheryl’s work:

So Easy Baby Food Kit: Make It Natural, Make It Fresh.
So Easy Baby Food Kit: Make It Natural, Make It Fresh.
Price: $23.85
An award-winning, all-inclusive solution for making baby food in less than 30 minutes per week. The month-by-month Cookbooks uses fresh ingredients with no additives. Kit includes a cookbook, freezer trays, how-to video, and nutrition card, and pays for itself in just three weeks compared to jarred baby food.

So Easy Baby Food Basics: Homemade Baby Food in Less Than 30 Minutes Per Week
So Easy Baby Food Basics: Homemade Baby Food in Less Than 30 Minutes Per Week
Price: $8.95
Baby Food Cookbook including recipes and instruction for making stage 1, 2, and 3 baby foods. This book also includes the basics of introducing solid foods and developing healthy eating habits. Available in English and Spanish.

So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips & Simple Receipes for the Toddler Years
So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips & Simple Recipes for the Toddler Years
Price: $8.95
When it comes to eating, toddlers can be tough to please. So Easy Toddler Food is the perfect resource for parents looking for survival tips and 35 simple recipes that will win over even the pickiest toddler. Available in English and Spanish.

Healthy Habits: Introducing Your Family to Yellow Foods

YELLOW FOODS

Healthy Habits: Introducing Your Family to Yellow Foods
A guest post from Cheryl Tallman, www.FreshBaby.com

Yellow fruits and vegetables come in a range of textures and flavors and contain a variety of beneficial vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidants.

Yellow is a great color – it’s the color of sunshine and sunshine energizes us. Next time you are at the market, ask your child to choose a sunny yellow fruit or vegetable, so they can enjoy the delicious energetic benefits of yellow foods.

Here’s more information about some of our favorite “sunshine” yellow foods:

Bananas- This fun and easy to eat fruit contains potassium, vitamins A, B-6, B-12, and C. Bananas provide a quick energy boost for hungry kids of all ages. Keep bananas on the counter for healthy after school snacking. Bananas are great added to smoothies, cereal, yogurt, pancakes, or baked goods.

Pineapples – Juicy, sweet pineapples provide the body with Bromelain, Vitamin A and C, and manganese. Bromelain is a natural anti-inflammatory that helps relieve swelling caused by injury or illness. Serve pineapples fresh, grilled, or add to sauces and salsas.

Yellow Peppers -Yellow peppers are a good source of dietary fiber, vitamins A, C, and B6 niacin, magnesium, copper, folate, potassium and manganese. Add yellow peppers to pasta, stir-fry, and salads. Slice yellow peppers and serve with a side of salad dressing for a crunchy, sweet snack.

Yellow Squash – Yellow squash contains vitamin C, Iron, folate, beta-carotene, and lutein. Slice yellow squash and sauté with olive oil for a nutritious side dish, or add to casseroles for extra goodness.

Corn – Nothing says summer like fresh corn, and watching a young child eat corn on the cob can be a memorable experience! Corn provides the body with beneficial anti-oxidants to help prevent disease and fiber for healthy digestion. Steam, boil or grill corn on the cob, or cut the kernels from the cob and serve as a side dish, or add it to soups, stews, salads and casseroles.

Lemons – Lemons are a good source of vitamin C. Plus, they are a cleansing food. Squeezing a slice of lemon into a glass of water each day can aid digestion problems and remove impurities from the body. Adding a little slice of lemon to your kid’s water can be a great way to get them to drink more water. You can also squeeze fresh lemon juice over vegetables, poultry and fish.

Yellow Pears -Loaded with vitamins, minerals, and cancer preventing anti-oxidants, pears are a healthy and delicious choice for snacks and side dishes. Pears also have a low glycemic index, which means they can help control blood sugar levels. Pears provide the body with vitamins A, C, B1, B2, and E, folate, potassium, iron, and fiber.   Slice pears and serve alone, or add to salads and smoothies. 

About the author: Cheryl Tallman is the co-founder of Fresh Baby, creators of the award-winning So Easy Baby Food Kit, and author of the So Easy Baby Food and the new book So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips and Simple Recipes for the Toddler Years. Visit Cheryl online at www.FreshBaby.com for more delicious tips.

Learn more about Cheryl’s work:

So Easy Baby Food Kit: Make It Natural, Make It Fresh.
So Easy Baby Food Kit: Make It Natural, Make It Fresh.
Price: $23.85
An award-winning, all-inclusive solution for making baby food in less than 30 minutes per week. The month-by-month Cookbooks uses fresh ingredients with no additives. Kit includes a cookbook, freezer trays, how-to video, and nutrition card, and pays for itself in just three weeks compared to jarred baby food.

So Easy Baby Food Basics: Homemade Baby Food in Less Than 30 Minutes Per Week
So Easy Baby Food Basics: Homemade Baby Food in Less Than 30 Minutes Per Week
Price: $8.95
Baby Food Cookbook including recipes and instruction for making stage 1, 2, and 3 baby foods. This book also includes the basics of introducing solid foods and developing healthy eating habits. Available in English and Spanish.

So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips & Simple Receipes for the Toddler Years
So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips & Simple Recipes for the Toddler Years
Price: $8.95
When it comes to eating, toddlers can be tough to please. So Easy Toddler Food is the perfect resource for parents looking for survival tips and 35 simple recipes that will win over even the pickiest toddler. Available in English and Spanish.

Healthy Habits: Introducing Your Family to Red Foods

Healthy Habits: Introducing Your Family to Red Foods
A guest post from Cheryl Tallman, Creator of FreshBaby.com

In Japan, the color red signifies energy and power and is often used as a color for heroic figures. This is a good description because when you include red fruits and vegetables in your child’s meals, they will grow up strong like superheroes.

Red foods are packed with lots of vitamins and minerals like vitamin A, vitamin C and potassium. Red foods also contain compounds called phytochemicals, which have been shown to have positive health benefits. Phytochemicals you might have heard about include flavonoids, lycopene, reservatol and capsaicin.

Make a game out of letting your kids choose one “superhero” red food to eat every day. Our favorite red foods include:

* Strawberries – Strawberries are loaded with vitamin C, potassium, and folate. Strawberries are best fresh, for a special treat add them to yogurt, cereal and smoothies.

* Tomatoes -Tomatoes are a great source of lycopene, potassium and vitamin C. They taste great fresh off the vine and cooked in sauces, stews and soups. Try them with scrambled eggs.

* Red Peppers – A bright red pepper contains potassium, vitamin A and vitamin C. Red Peppers can be served raw as a snack or in salads, cooked in pasta and stir fry dishes or roasted in soups and stews.

* Apples
– The wonderful shiny red apple contains soluble fiber, pectin and flavonoids. For a healthy afternoon snack, slice an apple and top with peanut butter. Yummy!

* Watermelon – You know its summer time when you see watermelons. Watermelons are packed with vitamin A, vitamin C and lycopene. A big slice of fresh watermelon is sure to put a smile on your little one’s face.

* Red Beets – Red beets contain iron, niacin and potassium. Start introducing red beets to kids in salads or roasted with olive oil and ground pepper. Pickled red beets are also a good introduction.

* Red Grapes – Red Grapes contain flavonoids, reservatol and quercitin to help keep your heart healthy and strong. Grapes are a great snack. Freeze them for a hot summertime treat.

* Cherries – Cherries are considered a nutritional super food because they are loaded with antioxidants and vitamins and, they taste great! Remove the pits to make it easier for little ones to enjoy this delicious treat.

About the author: Cheryl Tallman is the co-founder of Fresh Baby, creators of the award-winning So Easy Baby Food Kit, and author of the So Easy Baby Food and the new book So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips and Simple Recipes for the Toddler Years. Visit Cheryl online at www.FreshBaby.com for more delicious tips.

Learn more about Cheryl’s work:

So Easy Baby Food Kit: Make It Natural, Make It Fresh.
So Easy Baby Food Kit: Make It Natural, Make It Fresh.
Price: $23.85
An award-winning, all-inclusive solution for making baby food in less than 30 minutes per week. The month-by-month Cookbooks uses fresh ingredients with no additives. Kit includes a cookbook, freezer trays, how-to video, and nutrition card, and pays for itself in just three weeks compared to jarred baby food.

So Easy Baby Food Basics: Homemade Baby Food in Less Than 30 Minutes Per Week
So Easy Baby Food Basics: Homemade Baby Food in Less Than 30 Minutes Per Week
Price: $8.95
Baby Food Cookbook including recipes and instruction for making stage 1, 2, and 3 baby foods. This book also includes the basics of introducing solid foods and developing healthy eating habits. Available in English and Spanish.

So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips & Simple Receipes for the Toddler Years
So Easy Toddler Food: Survival Tips & Simple Recipes for the Toddler Years
Price: $8.95
When it comes to eating, toddlers can be tough to please. So Easy Toddler Food is the perfect resource for parents looking for survival tips and 35 simple recipes that will win over even the pickiest toddler. Available in English and Spanish.

Free Subscription – Baby Talk Magazine

babytalk

For a limited time, you can get a free subscription to Baby Talk Magazine through this link.  (I’m not sure how long this deal might last.)

Read Momscape’s article How to Score Free and Discounted Items for Babies for more deals and free stuffs for new moms.

See more Offers for Free Stuff.

And subscribe to our daily deals alert for even more great online coupon codes and deals.

 

More Halloween Freebies and Fun

halloween-900x300

We had so much great feedback on our first roundup of Halloween Freebies and Fun,  we wanted to do it again.

Halloween Savings

Get 31 Days of Halloween Freebies from about.com. Then check out Halloween Coupons and Freebies from Susies-Coupons.

Halloween Crafts



Make a Silhouette Pumpkin
I love this vintage, chic idea – from oh-lovely-day.com

Or try this: How to Decoupage Halloween Pumpkins, from MakeandTakes.com

We also love these ric rac and lace spiders from the crafting chicks.

DIY Printables and Craft Projects from Target:
Iron on Trick or Treat Bag

Eerie Decorative Lighting

In honor of The Muppets, which opens in theaters everywhere November 23rd, here’s a PDF of  Fozzie’s Favorite Halloween Jokes.

Last-Minute Halloween Costume Ideas

From the pages of Real Simple Magazine
10 Last-Minute Costume Ideas
Never got around to buying that Morticia Addams ensemble? Harness the Halloween spirit with a kooky (but not creepy) look that you can pull together in a snap, snap.

Easy DIY Costumes
Have some more time to play with but still want to save money? Use items you have around the house to make one of these costumes, and your child will be the shining star of the Halloween parade.

 

Homemade Halloween Makeup – Recipes

Guest post by Tawra Kellam, http://www.LivingOnADime.com

The average American family spends over $100 per year on Halloween goodies. As your kids drag you through aisles full of ghosts and goblins, the scariest thing about Halloween is threatening to leave bite marks in your pocketbook. No wonder so many moms flee screaming from the store… It can be much less expensive and a lot more fun to devise your own chilling creations. Here are a few tips that you can use to stave off the greenback gremlins and exercise your creative muscle. It won’t hurt a bit! These and other free frugal tips are available at www.LivingOnADime.com.

Face Paint
1 tsp. corn starch
1/2 tsp. water
1/2 tsp. cold cream
food coloring

Mix all ingredients together in an old muffin pan and you are ready to paint. This amount makes one color.

 

Fake Wound
1 Tbsp Vaseline
tissue
cocoa powder
2-3 drops red food coloring

Place Vaseline in a bowl. Add food coloring. Blend with a toothpick. Stir in a pinch of cocoa to make a darker blood color. Separate tissue. Using 1 layer, tear a 2×3 inch piece and place at wound site. Cover with petroleum jelly and mold into the shape of a wound. The center should be lower than the sides. Fill the center with the red petroleum jelly mixture. Sprinkle center with some cocoa. Sprinkle a little around the edges of the wound to make darker.

 

Fake Blood- Mix 2/3 cup white corn syrup, 1 tsp. red food coloring, 2-3 drops blue food coloring to darken and 1 squirt dish soap (helps blood to run well).

Abrasions -Dab brown, red and black eye shadow on area. Apply blood over area with cotton balls. Use comb to gently scratch area in one direction. Apply cocoa or dirt over wound with cotton balls.

Black Eye – Apply red and blue eye shadow to depressions around eyes.

Bruises – Rub red and blue shadow over bony area to simulate recent bruises. Blue and yellow eye shadow to create older bruises.

Look Old – Cover face with baby powder. Draw dark lines on your skin for wrinkles. Smooth edges to blend. Cover again with baby powder. Add baby powder to your hair to create gray hair.

Deviled Eyeballs – Make deviled eggs. Add a green olive with pimento in the center for an “eyeball”.

Radioactive Juice- Mix equal parts Mountain Dew and blue Kool-Aid

Toxic Juice- Add some green food coloring to lemonade for a spooky color!

Brains- Scramble eggs with some green, yellow and blue food coloring

Bloody Eyeballs- Boil cherry tomatoes 30 seconds. Allow to cool; then peel skin.

Goblin Hand- Freeze green Kool-Aid in a rubber or latex glove, float in punch.

Use the tape from old cassettes or black yarn to make spider webs.

Use cotton balls stretched out for small spider webs.

Glass Jack-o-Lantern- Outline a pumpkin face on a spaghetti or pickle jar with black paint. The paint around the outside of it with orange paint. Place a candle inside for a jack-o-lantern.

 

Now here are some fun Halloween Party Games

Halloween Guess It Game

In this game, you challenge the participants to reach into mystery boxes filled with creepy things and try to guess what each item is. The person with the most correct answers wins the game. An example is if you want them to guess “grapes”, you might try to confuse them by saying, “I think it’s eyeballs…”

Cut a hole in the top of a shoe box or laundry box for each item to be used. Cover the box with black spray paint. Decorate each box with pumpkins or spiders for a more festive flavor. Place the following items inside, one per box. Be sure to place enough of each item so the guests can adequately “feel” the guts.

Eyeballs – grapes or peeled cherry tomatoes

Intestines- Cooked Spaghetti

Skin- oil a piece of plastic bag

Brains- scrambled eggs

Hair- an old clown wig

Bones- thoroughly washed chicken bones placed in some sand

Vomit-chunky salsa

Fingers-hot dogs cut into finger sized pieces

Teeth- corn nuts, pine nuts or popcorn

 

Have a Pumpkin Hunt

Hide mini pumpkins like you would Easter Eggs. Let the kids find and decorate them. For small children use glue sticks with construction paper cut-outs for decorations.

 

Edible Slime

Pour lime gelatin into a glass bowl. After it is partially set, add gummy worms. Chill until lightly set. Then serve slopped all over the plate.

 

Bloody Popcorn- Add red food color to melted butter and pour over popcorn.

Freeze gummy worms in ice cubes and add them to drinks. Cut gummy worms in half if needed.

 

About the authors:
Jill Cooper and Tawra Kellam are frugal living experts and the authors of the Dining On A Dime Cookbook. Dining On A Dime will help you save money on groceries and get out of debt, by cooking quick and simple homemade meals. For free tips & recipes visit http://www.LivingOnADime.com